Suzuki DR650 Gas Tank Page

 

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Suzuki DR650 Gas, Fuel, Petrol Tank Page

 

Suzuki DR650

 

Fuel Tanks

Tank Petcock Settings

Inline Fuel Filter

Intank Filter

Tank Graphics/Color

Rattle Can

Full Out Paint Job

Bed Liner Coating

Bra or Tank Cover

Decals

Adapter for Acerbis 6.6 gallon (25 liter) Tank

Front Bracket Adapter

Rear Bracket Adapter

Installation Instructions

Parts needed

 


Gas Tank

The DR650 started out with a nice 21 liter fuel tank and in an effort to cut weight, went to a 17 liter fuel tank in 1992.  In 1996, Suzuki decided on a 13L fuel tank for it's lighter DR650SE.  The stock fuel tanks, particularly in the newer 1996+ DRs, are less than ideal for long runs in remote areas or even for weekly commutes.  This can really limit how far you can travel into the outback before you need to turn back for fuel.  It also increases the number of fill-ups you will need each week if you are commuting with your DR650.

 

Luckily, there are several fuel tank upgrade options available and you can always strap on an extra fuel can or two.

 

Pre 96 DR650 Steel Fuel Tank

Pre 96 DR650 Steel Fuel Tank

 

Pre 1996 DR650s (Stock - 1990-91 21L; 1992-95 4.5gal/17L; 1992-95 California 4.2gal/16L):

 

Post 1996 DR650s (Stock 3.4 gal (13L) or 3.2 gal (12L) for California DRs):

 

Generic Auxiliary Fuel Tanks and the like:

Post 96 DR650 with pre 96 Acerbis tank

Post 96 DR650 with pre 96 Acerbis tank

Links:

 

 


Tank Petcock Settings

The stock petcock uses a vacuum assist so that it doesn't flood the carburetor and engine should the carb float get stuck.  This is a good safety feature but the vacuum diaphragm has been known to get stuck making starts impossible.

 

The stock petcock has three settings:

 

Related Links:

 

 


Inline Fuel Filter

 

Seems like a good idea and they can also save your carburetor or engine..  Some DR riders recommend against these as there already is a filter sock in the stock tank making an additional filter redundant, unnecessary and another item to fail.  They can also get clogged up, which means they are doing their job.   In line filters are also much easier and less messy to replace or clean than a petcock filter.  Because of this, some riders remove the petcock screen and install an inline filter.

 

 

 

 

Topgunmotorcycles

 

 


Fuel Tank Filter

 

Strainers can be used in the fuel tank to decrease the amount of debris that settles at the bottom of your tank.  This is especially useful if travelling in places where you end up refueling form a fuel can instead of from a computerized pump that accept credit cards.

 

Pro Filter

 

Why would you set up a petrol stand in front of a big puddle of water?  On the bight side, compared to the pump in the town down the road, at least  you can see if there is any sediment present in this fuel.  And then you can use the bottle for drinking water later, but I won't advise drinking out of it.

 

 


Tank Graphics/Color

Most of the fuel tanks available for the DR650s are plastic polyethylene.  They are sometimes made in a handful of basic colors or come in just white.  If you don't care about esthetics, these are just fine, as they are waterproof, lightweight, don't rust and although they may not be road legal, the authorities generally don't know or care.  If you do care about how your bike looks, in that you want a nice looking bike or one that blends into the environment or just don't want a bike that looks like a toy put together by a child - you may have a challenge on your hand.

 

It is difficult and sometimes impossible to get paint to stick and stay on polyethylene.  This is partially do the the physical characteristics of poly which resists paints sticking to it, the flexibility of poly and the fact that gas vapors seem to breath through the poly which can cause bubbling of paint.  People have tried sanding, torching, priming, sealing the inside of the tanks and painting these tanks with various types of paint with mixed results - most of them poor.

 

 

Rattle Can

For metal tanks, rattle can jobs are fine.  You can get a reasonable paint job with a little prep work, or at the very least - a new color for not very much money.  the is great for the blacked out look or camo jobs and touchups after crashes are simple and cheap.

 

For plastic tanks, some rattle cans stick to better than others, but they all seem to eventually scratch off, with some peeling off by the handful.  If you don't care too much about having a "finished" look, you can experiment with paints, find one that sticks and touch up as necessary (perhaps each week).  If you do find a good paint that seems to stick, you may find that it will bubble up after its first exposure to the sun.

 

 

Full Out Paint Job

If you really care about looks and don't plan on every laying down your bike, you can take off a metal tank and paint whatever you want on it.

 

In regards to plastic tanks - remember what Homer Simpson says.  "Trying is the first step to failure."  The main problem is that fuel vapors will pass through plastic fuel tanks, but not though paint on tanks.  This often results in bubbling of paint (if it doesn't peel off first).  You can successfully pain a plastic fuel tank, but it's more challenging than you may think.  Even BMW tried painting their plastic tanks on early GS1100's - with disastrous results.

 

Check out the links below and let me know how your paint job turned out.  Some tank painters will stress the need to seal the inside of your tank prior to painting to prevent paint bubbling, but keep in mind all the horror stories out there of tank sealers coming loose inside tanks and make giant messes.

 

 

Related Paint links:

 

 

Related Tank Sealing links:

 

 

Bed Liner Coating

Another approach to color, texture and even protection is coating a tank with spray on bedliner.  This can a really nice utilitarian/industrial look to it and you can often color match your liner if you don't like black.  I've heard of these bubbling up on plastic tanks, but have never seen it.

 

 

Bra or Tank Cover

You can custom make a bra with some heavy duty marine grade vinyl.  If you can sew, you've got a project.  If you can't sew, you can use vinyl cement to glue pieces together.  Since a fuel tank can have a very complex shape, you can use duct tape to make a pattern on the tank, transfer it to the vinyl, cut out the shape and cement them together.  With little talent, you can create a new rugged or soft look for your bike.

 

If you are creative, you can also attach a tank bag, pockets, knife/machete sheath, reflective tape, lights, graphics, studs/spikes, slider plates, rhinestones, trinkets, hand stitched leather, sheep's skin, camouflage netting, etc to a tank cover.

 

 

Decals

If like the stickered look or have a cool graphic in mind (shark teeth), these should fit onto a metal tank will little effort.  If you are placing decals or stickers on a plastic tank, you may need to first perforate them so that they don't bubble up.  You can use a sharp knife or a special perforating tool from a hobby store.

 

 


Adapter for Acerbis 6.6 gallon (25 liter) Tank

The 6.6 gallon Acerbis tank for pre'96 DR650s is a nice size and larger than all the post '96 DR650SE tank options except for the Aqualine 8 gallon (30 liter) Safari tank and other true safari custom tanks.  The 6.6 gallon Acerbis tank is also pretty economical and can be fitted to 1996 and newer DR650SEs with a set of brackets and a few minor adjustments to the bike. 

 

Post 96 DR650 with pre 96 Acerbis tank

Post 96 DR650 with pre 96 Acerbis tank

 

The adapter for this conversion was commercially available in the past, but no longer seems to be readily available.  Luckily the adapter brackes are simple to fabricate as long as you have a grinder, drill and welder handy.

 

 

Front Bracket Adapter

 

 

 

 

Rear Bracket Adapter

 

 

 

 

Installation Instructions

  1. Disconnect the fuel hose and vacuum line from your stock fuel tank petcock.
  2. Remove the stock fuel tank.
  3. Remove and discard the black plastic cover in front of your stock tank.
  4. Use the the vacuum plug that comes with the Acerbis tank or other suitable item to plug the vacuum hose fitting that comes out of the carburetor to the petcock on the stock tank.  This must be air tight and secure to prevent a future vacuum leak.
  5. Disconnect and remove the ignition coil.

     

    Ignition Coil

    Ignition Coil and Bracket

     
  6. You will need to tile the coil cooler forward.  One option is to remove and discard the mounting bolts of the radiator bracket.  Refit using the longer bolts, putting one of the diagonal sleeves between the bracket and the frame. The other two sleeves go on top of the bracket, forcing it to tilt forward.  Another option is to modify or fabricate a new oil cooler mounting bracket.


    Oil cooler and Guard

     
    Note: The sleeves behind and in front of the bracket must be in the correct position, or you will damage something!

  7. On the front fender, loosen the front mounting bolts and remove the rear bolts that attach the fender to the triple clamp. Fit 2 of the 10mm long sleeves and a washer between the triple clamp and the top of the guard and attach with bolts and washers.

     

    Front Fender

    Front Fender

  8.  

  9. Check clearance between front fender and oil cooler and add washers under it if necessary.
  10. Bolt the rear bracket onto the frame with the countersunk screws using thread lock.
  11. On the top engine mount plate, loosen the rear bolt and remove and discard the other two.

    Upper Plates

    Upper Plates

     
  12. Fit the font bracket into place with the longer 8.8 grade M8x60mm and M8x65mm bolts. The tube on the bracket should be as far back as possible, so you may wish to drill the bottom hole on the front bracket after you align the bracket on the frame.
  13. Tighten all THREE bolts on the top engine mount plate.
  14. You will need to make enlarge the mounting holes on the ignition coil bracket or otherwise modify the bracket, so that the ignition coil doesn't touch the front bracket.
  15. Reinstall the ignition coil.
  16. Attach the 2 adapters and rubber spacers (supplied with the Acerbis tank) to the tube on the bracket.
  17. Try fitting the tank. Check that it is not resting on the oil pipe at the top of the cylinder head. You can give this a slight inward bend with a rubber hammer.  If the tank touches either the oil pipe or radiator bracket, glue a piece of rubber onto the tank.
  18. Move the handlebars from lock to lock, checking clearance of you signal lights with the tank.
  19. Use your sleeve nuts to bolt down the rear of the tank to the rear bracket.
  20. Add a small amount of gas to the tank and check for leaks.

 

 

Parts Needed

  1. Acerbis 6.6 gallon (25 liter) tank - [P/N 11158806]
  2. 4 x Steel sleeves, 10mm long x 10mmŲ outside x 7mmŲ inside
  3. 2 x aluminum or steel sleeves, 14mm long x 9mmŲ inside, diagonally cut (for tilting radiator)
  4. 2 x M6x30mm bolts - for front fender
  5. 4 x M6 washers - for front fender
  6. 2 x M6 bolts, flat head, beveled neck for countersinking, preferably Allen head
  7. 2 x M6 sleeve nuts, flat Allen head or similar, shaft (sleeve) 16mm long

     Allen Head Sleeve Nuts Sleeve Nut Diagram

     

    Note: if you can't readily find M6 sleeve nuts, use 5mm longer bolts (M6 x 27mm) for the rear bracket to allow for use of ordinary nuts and washers
  8. 1 x M8x35mm bolt - for oil cooler
  9. 1 x 8.8 grade M8x120mm bolt - for oil cooler
  10. 1 x 8.8 grade M8x60mm bolt - for engine mount
  11. 1 x 8.8 grade M8x65mm bolt - for engine mount
  12. 3 x lock M8 nuts
  13. 7 x M8 washers
  14. Thread lock (like Loctite blue)
  15. Materials for front and rear brackets:
    1. 103mm long round tube with inside diameter of 11mm
    2. 93mm long round tube with inner diameter of 8.5-9mm
    3. Flat bar about 200 x 25 x 2.5mm
    4. Flat bar 123 x 29 x 4mm
    5. 2 x M6x22mm bolts, flat head, beveled neck for countersinking, preferably Allen head
    6. Can of spray paint

 

 

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